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Specialty coffee, courtesy of prized baristas

VietNamNet Bridge – I knew I would like Hung as soon as I saw his striped, rainbow-hued socks.

A showman, you say? No way.

Nguyen Canh Hung is one of HCM City’s quiet, unassuming coffee masters whose business, the Bosgaurus café, specialises in serving a great product in the most transparent way possible.


Specialty coffee, courtesy of prized baristas

Winning moves: Baristas at Bosgaurus have won top awards, including the top prize at Viet Nam’s national barista competition. VNS photo Susan Ransdell


In other words, he’s the real deal. He doesn’t have anything to hide, and he wants you to know it.

When he talks about “quality”, he knows what’s what. 

Not all café owners in HCM City, which has seen a veritable boom in coffee shops in the last few years, can back up their branding spin.

Hung’s product speaks for itself. Though he’s not averse to promotion, his approach is, as he says, “slow, natural marketing”.

As an authorised Specialty Coffee Association of Europe (SCAE) trainer, Hung holds cupping workshops for the public, lending his expertise to those who want to learn more about specialty coffee (as opposed to commercial coffee, which is processed on a massive scale, often with lower-quality beans).

Though he imports top-quality Arabica beans from Ethiopia, Honduras and elsewhere, Hung also works directly with farmers in Lam Dong Province in the production of Arabica, a higher quality bean than Robusta, the bean that Viet Nam predominantly exports and drinks.

An engineer by trade, Hung, 41, fell under coffee’s spell when he travelled to Europe for work.

“I’d always thought of coffee one way, but travelling really opened up my mind to other tastes,” he said.

In Viet Nam, he had been used to the ubiquitous café da (iced) or café sua da (iced with milk), made with Robusta beans and condensed milk. It’s a strong, dark, and bitter brew.

But, at his café, Hung uses only Arabica beans, including in the traditional café sua da, which contains a blend of Arabica from Da Lat and Ethiopia, processed in his giant Giesen roasters on the ground floor. (He stores his beans in a climate- and humidity-controlled room in the basement).

The Vietnamese drink is offered in three different roast styles: Tender, Fumée and The Big Smoke, at VND60,000 (and VND65,000 with condensed milk). 

As I’m no lover of milky coffee, and have a preference for a darker roast, I chose the iced Fumée and was pleasantly surprised. Punchy, bright and a bit fruity. 

Master roaster

In Europe, Hung trained and studied with master roasters and learned as much as he could, saved up enough money to buy the best equipment, and then opened up his café in a villa in the Saigon Pearl complex in Binh Thanh District.


Specialty coffee, courtesy of prized baristas

Monitoring: Owner Nguyen Canh Hung (right) oversees his staff of baristas at his café Bosgaurus Coffee facing the Sai Gon River in HCM City. VNS Photo Susan Ransdell


The building, facing the Sai Gon River in a setting so serene that you can hear birds chirp and feel the wind in your hair, is only 10 minutes away from the city’s chaotic central business district.

The spacious white interior, with lots of glass, stainless steel, slim black chairs, and the occasional grey beanbag, stands in contrast to other cafés around town, with their warm wood tones and smaller spaces.

The outdoor terraces facing the tree-lined river are great for a chat or for working or surfing on a laptop for hours.

Though the open, airy atmosphere appeals to foreign customers, locals often prefer a cozier spot with tables closer together, according to Hung. Customers tend to be a mix of 60 per cent foreigners and 40 per cent Vietnamese.

To add a bit of colour to the minimalist space, Hung is introducing his newly designed 250 gram coffee packages, based on a traditional Dong Ho design, with detailed information: the date of harvest, the flavour note (body, acidity, finish and more), the farm note (location, altitude) and preferred brewing method (filter or espresso-based).

And soon, at an international coffee fair in Budapest, he will be introducing his roasted single-origin Ethiopian bean (heirloom variety, naturally processed) in the new Bosgaurus (named after Viet Nam’s Guar bison) packages.

For now, Hung sells his bags locally to individuals and businesses. He roasts the bean according to their requested flavour profile and allows them to package it under their name.

“That’s a win-win for everyone, and besides, their tastes may not be my taste,” he said.

Hung urged me to try one of his signature drinks, called Caramelly Rain, an espresso-based concoction (VND90,000) made with milk foam via an ice-dripped method that has the flavour of salted caramel.

Although I shun sugar in coffee, only a dab of simple sugar syrup and a bit of whipped cream were added to the blend, and it was, indeed, wonderfully caramelly.

“The caramel flavour comes completely from the natural sugar in the coffee, which is extracted as the espresso stream drips onto the ice cubes,” Hung said.

Besides coffee, the café has a full menu, with eggs benedict, omelettes and other breakfast items such as waffles and yogurt with oats.

He sticks to Western favourites such as Cobb and Caesar salads (VND125,000), as well as three pasta dishes (carbonara and Bolognese are VND135,000 each), developed from recipes by chef Jack Lee.

Organic and handcrafted teas and juices are also on offer, as well as craft beer, but you’re coming for the coffee, right? And the view’s not bad, either. In fact, it’s fabulous, and who knew that only 10 minutes away from downtown’s frenzy you could have specialty coffee in such a peaceful setting, delivered by Viet Nam’s top prize-winning baristas?  


Bosgaurus Coffee

Address: Saigon Pearl Villa 1D5, 92 Nguyen Huu Canh Street, Binh Thanh District, HCM City

Hours: Open daily, 7am – 9pm

Offerings: specialty coffee made from imported and locally sourced Arabica beans; Western style breakfast, lunch and dinner served in a quiet riverside setting. 








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